tatties and neeps – a trip to scotland

November 14, 2012  in inspiring places

Abstract landscape by Sania Pell

Over the half term school holiday recently we took a family trip to visit my old stomping ground of Edinburgh. I lived there for three years while studying printed textiles at the art college and we decided to take a city break up in Scotland and visit some friends. The train journey from London to Edinburgh Waverley whizzed by in a flash, as the countryside did through the mud-splattered glass of the windows. I took a little time taking experimental shots out of the window playing with blur and focus, and as the views changed so did my abstracted countryside. It began to rain towards the end of the journey and turned grey and dark, but the rain on the window added another layer to my images and made us really quite pleased to be in a cosy carriage.

Abstract landscape by Sania Pell

Abstract landscapes by Sania Pell

Abstract landscape by Sania Pell

Edinburgh is made up of the most beautiful architecture. The old town is Medieval and the new town is Georgian. Everywhere you look the architecture of the buildings is either fairytale or grand and sophisticated and even the new builds are contemporary and architecturally interesting and seem to fit in. For such a large, old city the countryside and sea are so close. Arthur’s Seat, an extinct volcano, juts upwards from almost the centre of the city, the Scottish Parliament at its feet and giving you the most amazing 360 degree views from its peak.

Edinburgh by Sania Pell

The first morning we walked up Calton Hill where, as a student, I used to visit the Beltane Fire Festival which marks the beginning of summer. At night fire would be carried in procession, drums banged to a rhythm, dancers writhing between columns wearing next to nothing. A pagan celebration that was really quite ‘other worldly’ and magical. In the daytime, it is still an impressive place to visit with large monuments, an observatory and a great view over Edinburgh. When we reached the top, my children pointed straight across to Arthur’s Seat and said “come on Mum, let’s go!”, so this was the morning of two hills. The view from the volcano’s peak was even more staggering, you had a wonderful view of the sea and other surrounding hills and countryside. Wandering around the rest of the city we saw the statue of Greyfriars Bobby and I told my children the sweet tale of this Terrier who sat and guarded his master’s grave for 14 years. The masonry in this graveyard was rather gruesome though, but perfect as it was Halloween.

Calton Hill in Edinburgh by Sania Pell

Details of Edinburgh by Sania Pell

Details of Edinburgh by Sania Pell

Details of Edinburgh by Sania Pell

Details of Edinburgh by Sania Pell

Another day we wandered through the New Town to Stockbridge, popping in to to see my friend Michelle at the Open Eye Gallery where there was a show of  prints by Victor Pasmore, an artist I love. We then walked along the beautiful river of Leith through ancient villages to the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art where it was the first day of the new S J Peploe exhibition, one of the Scottish Colourists who are a favourite of mine! It was a perfectly crisp sunny, autumn day and a perfect expedition to end a wonderful trip to Edinburgh.

Details of Edinburgh by Sania Pell

Above is the view across the old town, with the Castle in the distance at the end of The Royal Mile. The Georgian grandeur of the adjacent New Town streets is gorgeous and virtually all of them retain their original windows and doors. Many still have the family name on a plaque on the front door which really gives the houses personality.

Edinburgh doors by Sania Pell

Edinburgh door by Sania Pell

Edinburgh doors by Sania Pell

Below are the views from Calton Hill, across to Arthur’s Seat that we climbed, the countryside and out over the Firth of Forth estuary to the North Sea.

Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh - by Sania Pell

Edinburgh sky by Sania Pell

Seascape by Sania Pell

We also visited a jewellery designer friend at her home and some more friends who had opened a new shop a few days before we arrived, both of which are wonderful. I have those posts to finish and am looking forward to sharing them with you.

If you’ve never been to Edinburgh it’s a great place to visit, full of history and creativity, and you can walk almost everywhere. Just remember to wrap up warm or before you know it you’ll be popping in to one of the many pubs for a wee dram of whisky to warm you up.

 

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9 Comments

  1. Rachel says:

    ah Sania! you have made my home-town sing! thank you

  2. Oh Sania you’re the master of capturing the moody shade of greys just stunning :)

  3. Lara B. says:

    How beautiful those pictures, I never went to Scotland but I shore love to, and soon, very soon I’ll go to that beautiful and mysterious place of you.

    beijo

  4. Ali says:

    I was a student in Edinburgh too, many moons ago. Your pictures capture much of what I love about it.

  5. allesistgut says:

    Wonderful and beautiful photos. Both, from the landsccape and Edinburgh and especially the doors. I’ve never been there, but Scotland is on my to-do-list. :)
    Have a nice day.

  6. Lucy Bronk says:

    That black and white image of the monument is truly stunning Sania, I cant take my eyes of it. The details of the picture and the simplicity of the shot make for a stunning photo

  7. tina says:

    Bit sombre love??? But stunning:))

    I have yet to visit Edinburgh and have good weather.
    I LOVED your storytelling both in words and images.

    Have a good weekend x

  8. elisa says:

    sania dear, i’ve said it before, when i return to the uk you’ll have laid out my travels. my best guide. x

  9. Kory Schulze says:

    Thank you Sania for sharing your experiences with us. I never went there. I am glad to see those beautiful photos.

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